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-   -   last minute (http://www.cruisereviews.com/forum/general-cruise-chat/24741-last-minute.html)

linh 06-30-2003 10:26 PM

This may be a myth but here is my question.

I've heard several years ago that there is possibility of going standby on cruises i.e. show up at the cruise terminal at the date and time of departure and if there is space available you can go on for very low price.
Since I just moved to a city that has cruise departures, I would be interested in this.

I hope it's not a myth but it does sound too good to be true. Does anyone else know about this?
thanks

linh 06-30-2003 10:26 PM

This may be a myth but here is my question.

I've heard several years ago that there is possibility of going standby on cruises i.e. show up at the cruise terminal at the date and time of departure and if there is space available you can go on for very low price.
Since I just moved to a city that has cruise departures, I would be interested in this.

I hope it's not a myth but it does sound too good to be true. Does anyone else know about this?
thanks

Sue 07-02-2003 12:42 AM

It's not as crazy as it sounds. You could get "last minute deals" up to a couple of days before a ship sailed, but not the case now. The cruise lines must submit a list of passengers, crew, and cargo for security clearance. This is getting more stringent at every sailing we've done since 9/11. I'm really happy that they do this. We moved to Florida in 2000, and thought we could get some of the last minute deals, but they had even disappeared at that point. There's great deals out there. Go to a "cruise only" travel agent to book, and don't book over the internet.
Have fun if you decide on something. http://cruise-chat.com/groupee_commo.../icon_wink.gif

mimi-behr 10-12-2003 10:03 AM

i am so happy to find someone with the same question that i have. next week i will be in new orleans and had planned on trying a stand by listing. i cannot find any information other than be at the dock by noon and sign up. carnival could not even give me a ball park price but said he had never heard of this way being cheaper. Have you found out any other information? if so please let me know!!!

Crewzing 11-07-2003 03:41 AM

First off, usually ships sell out (especially RCCL and the CCL Glory which are in N.O.), and when they DO have rooms open, they dont sell them at a discount, they sell them at a PREMIUM!!

Typically when they have a cancellation, they get all the money that the person paid, so they are not losing anything. So they would actually SAVE money if you didn't go (less food, etc). So they usually sell cabins at the FULL TARIFF rates which is Brochure prices (which NOBODY PAYS).

Don't try this. What you CAN do is try to see if there is a cheap deal a week or so before hand on one of these ships (hoping they are not sold out).

Good luck.

Crewzing 11-07-2003 03:46 AM

Internet agencies (the biggies) are HUGE companies, and the cruise lines give them INCREDIBLE deals because they book so MANY customers.

Just a clue, I work for one, and our company (a few hundred people) booked over 750,000 people on Carnival last year. That is more than CARNIVAL booked themselves. Do you think Mom & Pop in the strip mall have that kind of clout for pricing? Plus, many offer 24 hr sales and customer service with a LIVE person. I would avoid the fly by night ones, yes. But a good well known site (yahoo, orbitz, expedia, travelnow, etc) is perfectly fine.

buck 11-14-2003 05:50 PM

I just booked on Travelocity and have received very good service. Docs came 30 days before cruise date and I haved called them several times and had excellent service. They got me a $200 discount off the original fare I had booked and an up grade from E2 to E1 as they had a one day sale and I happened to spot it and they made an adjustment with RCCL while they had me hold on the line. Then I received the C & A coupon for $125 and they honored that also, have gotten credit on my card already. Also RCCL wanted $509 each for airfare from SGO to Mia, got it on Travelocity for $313 each, will have to take a $20 cab ride each way but still saved about $350 on the air alone. Buck

Karen Knowlton 11-14-2003 07:35 PM

In response to Crewzing, it's not just the mega-agencies that get volume deals from the cruise lines. Smaller agencies may very well belong to a consortium that gets the same result. And smaller agencies may be able to offer you a little more personalized service, especially if they are close by you. So don't write them off! http://cruise-chat.com/groupee_commo...n_rolleyes.gif

Oggy Boy 11-15-2003 06:54 AM

<<and of course I disagree on the "Don't book on the internet" comment Internet agencies [the biggies) are HUGE companies, and the cruise lines give them INCREDIBLE deals because they book so MANY customers. Just a clue, I work for one, and our company [a few hundred people) booked over 750,000 people on Carnival last year. That is more than CARNIVAL booked themselves. Do you think Mom & Pop in the strip mall have that kind of clout for pricing? Plus, many offer 24 hr sales and customer service with a LIVE person. I would avoid the fly by night ones, yes. But a good well known site [yahoo, orbitz, expedia, travelnow, etc) is perfectly fine.>>

Carnival has made a huge point that it has enabled even the smallest agency to be competitive with the "on-line, mega, giant, super sellers of cruises".

They did this because while a good number of cruises were sold by this breed shortly after 9/11 when demand shrank to almost nothing, they could not produce enough yield to provide Carnival with the necessary profitability they needed to satisfy their shareholders. Bob Dickinson (CEO of Carnival) took the position that Carnival will allow the consumer to "book where they will feel most comfortable booking" not based on the availability of preferential pricing, but on the consumer's buying preference.

Carnival's flat rate pricing policy offers the consumer the opportunity to purchase from Carnival directly, the "on-line super agencies", a Ma and Pa brick and motar retail agency, a small Home-Based agent or even a third party distribution channel and pay exactly the same price. Have you heard of this policy and how has it affected your ability to maintain your booking levels?

My opinion is that it was instituted as a way to divert revenues away from the "large super mega agencies" and onto their own site as a direct booking, but it is being marketed as a consumer benefit.

Tom

Oggy Boy 11-15-2003 07:07 AM

<<Typically when they have a cancellation, they get all the money that the person paid, so they are not losing anything. So they would actually SAVE money if you didn't go [less food, etc). So they usually sell cabins at the FULL TARIFF rates which is Brochure prices [which NOBODY PAYS).>>

Actually, no cruise line likes to sail with an empty cabin. The reason is that they lose the opportunities for on-board revenue and the income for their employees.

Think about it. The food is already on the ship, the employees are there expecting to earn their tips, the bars are ready to serve drinks, the stores open...an empty cabin represents the loss of considerable income to a cruise line. During the first quarter of 2003 (the Iraq war) CLIA member cruise lines operated at 103% occupancy. Why? Because if they did not fill the cabins they would have dis-satisfied employees, food spoilage and lost revenues from shore excursions, photo revenue, spa revenues, casino, liquor and on and on.

Tom


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