Brussels Port Guide

The Brussels Port in Belgium is the cruiser's gateway to the country's capital city. As the largest urban area in Belgium, Brussels naturally is made up of many municipalities, 19 in fact. French and Dutch are both spoken here in this city of international politics (it's the home of NATO, or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But Brussels is much more than that. It's fast becoming a mecca of style and fashion, featuring hip bars, varied culinary venues, happening nightlife and lots of exhibitions and festivals to keep things lively. As visitors to the Brussels cruise port, you will be treated to architecture and sculptures around this Art Nouveau city, lots of shops to browse, and more than 80 museums.

Once you depart at the Brussels cruise terminal, you will find it easy to navigate the city via taxi or bus. Once you've hit downtown, walking is your best bet to explore around the area. Your Brussels port of call will give you a new appreciation of this capital city and all it has to offer.

Shopping

Antique fairs and flea markets abound here, so if you love to hunt for bargains on local treasures, you're in luck. The Place du Jeu de Balle is the site of the city's most popular large flea market called Marché aux Puces, open all year round. Deal hunters will find souvenirs, household goods, decorations and more. Antique lovers won't want to miss the Sablon Antiques Market in Place du Grand Sablon, with more than 100 vendors selling a variety of antiques. Chocolate lovers are also in luck, as Brussels is known for its creamy pralines. Check out the Chocolatier Mary, at Rue Royale, offering more than 70 kinds of pralines.

The oldest mall in Europe, Galeries Royales St-Hubert, features a glass roof and countless boutiques, eateries, cafes and book shops. Lace is a big commodity in Brussels. It's sold everywhere, but you may want to stick to the more reputable dealers, such as Manufacture Belge de Dentelle at Galerie de la Reine.

Things to See

With so many museums to choose from in Brussels, it can be hard figuring out which ones to visit. If you're into music, you may want to stop in at the Musée des Instruments de Musique (MIM) on Rue Montagne de la Cour 2. The MIM showcases more than 1,500 instruments hailing from all over the globe. The building itself is styled around Art Nouveau, with exhibits ranging from an extremely rare spinet-harpsichord from 1619 and a hands-on exhibit for the youngsters.

The Grand Place is a must see, although it's hard to miss. This square, representing the heart of Brussels, hosts so many of the city's free concerts, fairs, parades and pageants. You'll find the Town Hall here, as well as many restaurants, museums, cafes and shops.

Restaurants and Bars

Hungry travelers need not worry about their next meal. La Manufacture, a former leather goods factory, is a popular eatery serving up a blend of Mediterranean and Asian cuisines such as ostrich or salmon dishes. For a romantic, secluded dinner, try Amadeus on Rue Veydt 13. Candlelight and dark colored walls set the stage for private seating for dining on caramelized spare ribs and ricotta and spinach tortellini.

From dining to culture to entertainment, the Brussels port in Belgium has something for every kind of traveler.

 

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